Burgers' Mangrove
Burgers' Mangrove

Burgers' Mangrove

The current Mangrove Hall was constructed in the 1980s as a trial run for the planned Bush. Afterwards the hall was renovated and made into Burgers' Mangrove. The more than 30 mangrove plants that can be seen here are botanically very valuable and therefore included in the Foundation National Plant Collection. Plant species that can survive in the saltwater mangroves along the tropical coasts, have developed various adaptations. For example, the aerial roots with which they are anchored into the mud and which lift them out of the periodically salty marsh.

Between the tree roots

Between the tree roots

In the Mangrove Hall are also about twenty animal species from the South-East Asian mangroves. Seven-spot archerfish, silver moonfish and pike-characins swim between the tree roots. The constant change at the mouth of the river between fresh water, brackish water and salt water is physiologically a special challenge for the fish. The birds on the tree branches have it a little easier just foraging and nestling. With a little luck you may also see the king parrots and the grey catbird or discover the up to 100 cm long sail-finned lizards in the branches.

The Asian River landscape

The Asian River landscape

The second part of the Mangrove Hall shows a piece of the Asian River landscape. In the water swim large sutchi catfish. You probably know these fish under their scientific name 'Pangasius'. Also the Bornean River turtles (Orlitia Borneensis) swim here. These specimens were confiscated in Hong Kong in 2001. The animals were intended for the food market in China. Zoos throughout Europe and America took in the turtles - most of which were in very poor health - to care for them. They really feel at home in the Mangrove Hall and have even multiplied already.